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Dave Garces rode a motorcycle from Quito to Aconcagua, climbed it and rode back [EP 268]

Climber and Motorcycle Adventurer Dave Garces rode his bike from Quito to Aconcagua, climbed it, and rode back. He tells us about that adventure, his quest to do the 7 summits in this style, and his business Ecuador Bike Rentals.

Show Notes

Introduction to the outdoors

Well, my outdoor hobby would be motorcycling. Adventure motorcycling and climbing itself started with my dad.

When I was two years old, he basically took me to the highest mountains here in Ecuador, Cotopaxi, Chimborazo, over 18,000 feet high. So that's how I started it. Then basically I learned how to ride my first motorcycle when I was 14 and I haven't stopped since.

The Seven Summits

I used to work in the oil business since 2006, which basically allowed me to travel around the world. I've been in 83 countries so far. Basically, by me working in one of these countries, I just decided to start these seven summits when I first heard of it. So I've climbed Kilimanjaro for Africa. I've climbed the Elbrus for Europe and recently in 2019, I did Aconcagua for South America.

I'm missing basically four more summits, Denali for North America. Everest for Asia and the Carstensz Pyramid for Oceania and the Vinson Massif for Antarctica.

Riding a Motorcycle to all Seven Summits

My plan now is basically to start all over again to make it count and to be honest for one thing. The second thing is I really like to take this opportunity. I mean, I have to ride the world on a motorcycle. So that being said, I have very good chances to accomplish what I'm looking for. The first attempt I had was Aconcagua in December 2019. Which is basically the closest.

Still, it was around 13,000 miles back and forth in four weeks. And also included nine days of climbing.

Aconcagua

It was the beginning of the project. If I couldn't have made it, then that was the end of it. It's not the easiest or the hardest either of all seven, but for one it is the cheapest and the second is the closest.

And one thing is physical strength, but the other one is mental strength. It was basically four and a half weeks being by myself, you know, inside of my helmet and then just walking on my own. All of these thoughts, you know, can drive you crazy.

Ecuador Bike Rentals

I'm working at the company as a chief mechanic and a tour guide. The company is based in Quito. Ecuador. We have another branch on the coast. So what we do basically is motorcycle rentals, guided tours, self-guided tours, and custom-tailored tours. You tell us for instance, what's your budget and how long you have on the time frame. And then we build an adventure for you.

We have intercoms connected helmet to helmet. So we basically speak with the whole party telling them what they're seeing. If there is anything going on in front of the road. You know, any advice when it comes to riding itself. So that's the guided tour, the self-guided tour we give them a pre-program GPS with all the stops, hotels, and activities are included and the guys just follow the route and just go whenever they want to go and they stop and eat whatever they want to eat and so on.

We'll build a tour for you to go birdwatching. And we have class three and class four-plus rivers and have done some tours for those who want to go kayaking and river rafting.

Advice for getting into the Outdoor Adventure Biz

The main thing is, do not procrastinate. That's the worst thing you can do. I was talking to people after March 20th, 2020, and they regretted that trip they weren't able to take. Or that business, they couldn't startup. One of our clients, he was supposed to come and he just kept on the delaying and delaying. The reason he wanted to come and do the trip here in echo was that he had cancer. And unfortunately, he passed away without doing this trip.

Favorite piece of outdoor gear under a hundred dollars

Gore-Tex socks

Giving back

Ecuador Bike Rental is also helping Prosonrisa. So we're basically directing 30% of the revenue straight to these causes. Whether it's for educational material or kids who need organ transplants. Whatever you guys can do to help us out. Come enjoy Ecuador, have the ride of your life. And in the meanwhile, you are helping these people.

Follow up with David

Website: ecuadorbikerental.com

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Transcript

Welcome to episode 268 of the outdoor biz podcast, climber and motorcycle adventure, Dave, versus. Dave rode his bike from Quito to Aconcagua, climbed [00:00:50] it and rode back. He tells us about that adventure, his quest to do the seven summits in the same style and his business. Ecuador bike rentals brought to you this month by a Wolf gang, man and beast.

[00:01:01] [00:01:00] Hey David. Welcome to the show. Thank you, Rick. How are you? I'm good. How's it going today? Pretty good. Sunny day, Nick weather. Nice. What's the [00:01:10] temperature of warm, like 70 right now. It should be about a 28 Celsius thinks around 75 80. It's nice to hear. Yeah. [00:01:20] Good. Yeah. It's going to be a nice day here in Bishop, too.

[00:01:22] It's a winter time, but we're going to have a nice 60 degree day, so we'll take it. Have you been to the [00:01:30] United States? Yeah, I used to live in LA for three years when I was 15 and then, uh, went to work and travel when I was 20. [00:01:40] And so I bought this older, 1982 Ford old, uh, Four towers and I drove it from Massachusetts all the way to LA

[00:01:54] [00:01:50] yeah. Fun trip. Yeah. So you've always been an adventurous guy, even when you were young. Pretty much, yes. [00:02:00] Hard to stay still. Yeah, that's good. So how were you introduced to the outdoors? How did you get into climbing and outdoor stuff? Well, my, my doors [00:02:10] outdoors hobby would be motorcycling, adventure, motorcycling, and climbing itself that started with my dad.

[00:02:16] And when I was two years old, he basically took me to highest mountains here [00:02:20] in Ecuador Cotopaxi, chin badass, over 20,000, 18,000. Feet high. Um, so that's how I started it. Then basically [00:02:30] I learn how to run my first motorcycle when I was 14 and I would stop since. Interesting. So when you were two, so you guys went all kinds of crazy adventures as a kid, then were you climbing when you were [00:02:40] two?

[00:02:41] Uh, not properly climbing. I was basically strapped to my dad's back. Yeah. Gotcha. So you were scrambling around the ground and stuff and the dirt and all that? [00:02:50] Yeah. Yeah. And so how old were you when you rode your first motorcycle? I was 14. They learned how to write it in, uh, on a [00:03:00] farm. In, in Equilar. Yeah, it was, it was fun as well.

[00:03:03] There was a Yamaha two, one 50. Um, it was mostly just dirt riding, like dirt tracks, motorcross type stuff, or what kind of stuff? [00:03:10] Yeah, it was mainly motorcrossing. Gotcha. And so tell us about your project seven summits, two wheels. That sounds pretty exciting. You've you've [00:03:20] already climbed some of the seven summits, right?

[00:03:22] Yeah. Um, I used to be in the oil business since 2006, which basically allowed me to travel around the world. I've been [00:03:30] in 83 countries so far and in. Basically, you know, by me basing in one of these countries, I just decided to start this seven summits when I first [00:03:40] heard of it. Um, so I've climbed Kilimanjaro for Africa.

[00:03:44] I've climbed the elbows in Europe and recently to 2019, [00:03:50] I did also Aconcagua. Yeah for South America. Wow. I'm missing basically four more summits is Natalie for North America. Um, [00:04:00] Everest for Asia and the garden tends pyramid for Oceania and a month basin for Antarctica. Wow, you're close. And are you going to, [00:04:10] yeah.

[00:04:10] Are you going to do the rest of them with the motorcycle? You're going to start all over and you were talking about your project. You're kind of going to ride the bike to the mountain and then climate. [00:04:20] Yeah. Yeah. Well, my plan now is basically to start all over again to make it count and to be honest. So, uh, for one thing, the second thing is, yeah.

[00:04:30] [00:04:30] I really like to take this chance. I mean, this objectively, I have to ride the world on a motorcycle. So that being said, uh, you [00:04:40] know, I have very good chances to accomplish what I'm, what I'm looking for. Um, the first attempt I had was, uh, Aconcagua December, 2019. [00:04:50] Well, which is basically the closest Nicholas Martin to work with her.

[00:04:55] It's still, it was around 13,000 miles back and forth [00:05:00] in four weeks. And also that included nine days of climbing. So you wrote Holy cow. So what was the, what was the hardest part of that [00:05:10] journey? Was it the climate part? It was the getting to the mountain part. Well, the, the hardest part to be honest was just to keep myself in shape.

[00:05:19] A lot of [00:05:20] it was a lot of stamina on a, on a motorcycle riding, you know, there were some days with 800, 900 miles in one day, one goal. And after [00:05:30] that it was, um, you know, to make the trip, uh, a little bit more accessible, you know, cheaper. I was basically camping four days in a row and having my fifth day [00:05:40] on a hotel where I could just sleep in a bed and, uh, and you know, do some laundry in the bathroom and just dry it out on the way back in the back [00:05:50] of the motorcycle.

[00:05:52] Uh, so that's that. Those were hard days just to get there pretty much. I was on the rush [00:06:00] because I left on the separate fifth from Ecuador and I had only seven days to be before the season started in that once the system started, you know, you have like a [00:06:10] huge crowd of fields of, uh, people trying to get to the summit.

[00:06:13] And that makes no fun of, for anything. The downside on it is that you were basically, since you're out of season, [00:06:20] you don't. You don't rely on weather as another mountains, for instance, you know, especially wind in that canal is so fast and out of being [00:06:30] out of season, there's no warranty of anything. All right.

[00:06:33] So you just you're at the mercy of the nature. You got to pretty much do what she throws out. Yeah. Yeah. What was, [00:06:40] did you have, what was the climate like? Did you have good conditions or was it rough? Um, well, basically, you know, I arrived to the base of the mountain on the seventh, went to [00:06:50] Mendoza to the, the war, the clamping permit, and then whatever, what it takes four days to get to this.

[00:06:57] Um, neither the condor is at [00:07:00] 5,500 meter high. I did it in two days. Wow. Yeah. I was basically rushing myself up trying to figure it out how I was feeling. If I was, you know, with a good [00:07:10] stamina, good shape. I had also limited resources when it came to food and shelter and everything else. I was, um, I was clamping solo, so I was carrying all my [00:07:20] gear.

[00:07:21] That included tent, sleeping bag food, uh, climbing, gear, everything. So it was around 35 kilos in [00:07:30] one go. It was a lot of weight as, so, yeah. Yeah. Basically, I climb all the way up to 5,500 at needle. They call it the race, which is one of the [00:07:40] lads stations before the summit bit. And winter did not cooperate at all.

[00:07:46] I had this. Yeah, it was bad. I was having [00:07:50] around 120, not wins. Oh man. So yeah. I was trying to figure it out a way to, to give it a try. So there was a, there was this, uh, [00:08:00] weather window, about four on four and a half hours, five hours. So I decided to give it a try over very, so basically you go from the back of the mountain and then from the back [00:08:10] of the mountain, you go back to the front, to this long, long, long traverse, and then straight to a 6,500 meter high.

[00:08:17] And then the last push to the summit. [00:08:20] But before I actually arrived to the traverse while being under the weather window, I couldn't go any farther. I mean, I couldn't even stand up. I was [00:08:30] it's too tired. Oh. Cause the winter you're too tired. The wind. Wow. Geez. Yeah. So by the time I went back down to , I [00:08:40] found out that my tent was in pieces, although broken and the whole thing almost flew off.

[00:08:46] So. I had to go back down to [00:08:50] 4,300, two plus day more or less, and basically try to patch my, my tents and get some, uh, you know, more, uh, more food, even another to [00:09:00] try and get some good sleep over there. And then, uh, you know, I go back again up to 5,500 to four, another summer summit push. [00:09:10] Then you made it.

[00:09:12] Yes. I managed to finish it around 2:00 PM. I think I left the camp [00:09:20] around five, 2:00 PM. I was, I was in the center. You must have been exhausted. Yeah, it was, you know, in a way to be honest, it was a [00:09:30] little bit frustrating because you know, it was all this effort being away from home. I mean, it was all this budget to be booked out in one attempt and all those things, you know, just [00:09:40] craving in my head.

[00:09:40] So I was like, yeah. This needs to be done either way. I mean, it was the beginning of the, of the project. If, if I couldn't have made it, then that was the end of it. [00:09:50] Yeah, yeah. Yeah. I mean, I can come with, it's not the easiest and start the hardest either on full seven, but it's for one is the cheapest and the second is the [00:10:00] closest, the closest to.

[00:10:02] Well, so like you said, it was good training and good preparation for the rest of them, man, probably good that it threw those conditions at you because it [00:10:10] let you learn that, you know, I can, I can make it, I can tough it out and go back down. I can do all these things. Cause you know how it is on these mountains.

[00:10:16] You never know what you're going to get. Correct. And [00:10:20] the other thing is, I mean, one is, you know, uh, physical strength, but the other one is the mental strength unit, right. It was basically four and a half weeks being by myself, [00:10:30] uh, you know, inside of my helmet and then just walking on my own. Yeah. Yeah. All of these thoughts, you know, can drive you crazy.

[00:10:37] Yeah. So what was that like? What, what kind of, do you have any [00:10:40] examples of any thoughts that you had to push through that you want to talk about? Maybe they were personal things you don't want to talk about. I know what happens to me when I go on these trips, it's like, Oh man, just shut up and walk. [00:10:50] Yeah.

[00:10:51] Well, you know, when, when do they start it? Uh, it's it's, it's a nice fresh day. You start maybe a little bit of back aches from, from slipping [00:11:00] on the floor, but you just go along. Yeah. And you get to see so many stunning landscapes all the way from Peru and Chile, and then to Argentina that you [00:11:10] kind of like, forget what you're actually thinking.

[00:11:12] The problem is, is exactly, you know, as soon as you arrive to the camp site, uh, it could have been a desert or somewhere else. I was, [00:11:20] um, using this, this app called I Overlander, which basically tells you, you know, previous, uh, Previous adventures where they camped in the [00:11:30] good size of it, the bad sides, if it's dangerous or not dangerous.

[00:11:33] So, um, what I used to do most of the days was basically, you know, uh, park on the highway [00:11:40] before and check that there's no cars coming. And as soon as nobody would see me, it would just drive 10 minutes inside of the desert, uh, till I find a Bush or a tree, and [00:11:50] then just put my tent, you know, Away from the sight of everybody and come there.

[00:11:56] Um, you know, once everything was competent and raised, I would [00:12:00] just go for a 10 Kelly, take a run just to keep myself in shape, come back, cook myself, eat, sleep. Repeat. Yeah. Well man, that's [00:12:10] quite a journey. What was the, once you finished all that? What was the most rewarding part? Was it just the knowledge that, okay, I got this.

[00:12:17] I can do it. Or was it just, geez, man, [00:12:20] I'm glad I got off that mountain. Well mixed the mix, the flavors, I would say, um, you know, once you're up there, you, you feel that you're [00:12:30] you're capable of everything. And by the time you're woke down, I mean, you're. Your body passes you the bill and [00:12:40] says no wave was there.

[00:12:41] I mean, you need to step on reality in this. This was a tough thing to do. And so when you got [00:12:50] down, did you have to immediately ride back home or could you take a day to rest and relax? Well, I went to a Mendoza cause that was really accurate. So I went to [00:13:00] Mendoza to get some, some good steaks, a lot of food and wine to celebrate it.

[00:13:06]That's good. It was, um, it was basically [00:13:10] to, uh, to, uh, be able to right back up. Uh, but this was, I mean, since I had no, no there's stress going on my way up. And my idea was [00:13:20] to take it easy and going mostly off road rather than taking the Pan-American highway again, offer is that. But it seems sounds harder.

[00:13:29] Off-road [00:13:30] as opposed to the highway. Yeah, no, it was, it was, it was hard, but the scenery wise is much more rewarding than [00:13:40] going. No, but beautiful. Yeah. Yeah. So where did the idea come from to do the seven summits on seven summits, two wheels project. Did that, are you been [00:13:50] always, you've always been a climber, but did you always have adventures like this plan in your head or just pop in your head one day?

[00:13:57] Well, I was thinking what to do is, you [00:14:00] know, when you go for instance to seven summits.org, G org, it tells you, you know, that until 2017, I think, or 18, there's [00:14:10] been almost 670 people that has done the circuit. Yeah. Pretty popular now. Yeah. Very popular. Yeah, exactly. I mean, this is throughout the story, the [00:14:20] history of the second.

[00:14:21] Right. And, you know, riding around the world, you're looking at maybe 12 to 1400 people that has done it on the SUV's [00:14:30] or jeez cars, motorcycles, whatever. But so far, I mean, the, the project hasn't been together. In one go. [00:14:40] So that's what I thought. Okay. You know, I don't know why nobody has tried it before.

[00:14:44] Maybe someone has done it, but they didn't record it or, you know, they didn't speak up about it. [00:14:50] So I just want you to give it a try. Yeah. Something different. We're gonna take a little break and give some love to our sponsor. This episode is brought to you by mountain [00:15:00] hardware. Shop new arrivals@mountainhardware.com.

[00:15:03] Plus join elevated rewards for free shipping on all orders. Go to the outdoor biz podcast.com/mountain hardware [00:15:10] new and get yourself a cozy new fleet for spring as the outdoor biz podcast.com/mountain hardware. New now back to the show. And so next up on your list is [00:15:20] Denali. The next step on the list is an I yes.

[00:15:23] And when he stayed here was actually to take off April this year, but because of the pandemic and all the [00:15:30] issues with, uh, with the borders being closed it's yeah, it's, it's a tough call now. Right? So you don't have a date to start it. It's kind of dependent on when things open up. [00:15:40] Yeah. And obviously, I mean, I also depend on the mountain.

[00:15:44] You have where you can climb. Right. And since I'm doing it solo, then Allie has a lot of [00:15:50] problems with, uh, not problems, but you know, the main challenge in the finale besides the cold is crevasse. Yeah. Yeah. And it's, yeah, [00:16:00] it's tricky. Yeah. And it's a long way to get there before you start climbing. Right.

[00:16:05] Yeah. It's um, back and forth is basically double of what I did to, [00:16:10] um, to, um, to Mendoza. Wow. And you have to get a, a decline and you have to get a permit. From the park service. Yeah. Do you have that? You get that when you get that, you have that. [00:16:20] Okay. No, no, no, I haven't done it yet. Um, basically, you know, I was depending on what was going on with the rest of the borders, uh, I know that Nicaragua, Guatemala [00:16:30] and Panama, they have very strict regulations about, uh, immigration and customs.

[00:16:35] I mean, they have to do customs since I'm taking the bike all the way from Quito. [00:16:40] So it's it's yeah. Logistically speaking is a major challenge. And do you have any kind of support crew, you know, people that you can call back home or is it just you get on a bike and you [00:16:50] are on your way by yourself? Well, it's basically my family looking after me with a GPS system, but when it comes to [00:17:00] logistics, I've been on my own.

[00:17:02] I took the whole gear myself, struck it on the bike and yeah, I wrote it with it. Wow. And what kind of [00:17:10] a cooking setup do you have? What kind of food do you eat? Do you, do you stop at little towns and get fresh food or do you have freeze dried food? Well, mainly. Yeah, mainly it's, [00:17:20] uh, basically on, um, uh, you know, the typical gas station food.

[00:17:24] Gotcha. Yeah. Um, looking, trying to figure, you know, figured out a [00:17:30] way not to be hotdogs all the time burgers and have some, some decent meal, some vegetables sometimes. Yeah, exactly. Fresh fruit. [00:17:40] Yeah. There are times for instance, when that was happening at the desert and uh, in the North of Argentina or Chile, then in that case, it was [00:17:50] basically myself cooking.

[00:17:51] That was just the diet based on noodles and tuna fish. Yeah. That gets boring after a couple of days. [00:18:00] Yeah. You know, little by little, the, the diet changes that, you know, as soon as you get into the mountain, you start at creating more [00:18:10] calories because you're going to need them by 4,300. You have to deal with your body itself trying to digest what you eat.

[00:18:17] yeah, that's a whole nother set of problems. So [00:18:20] how do you have any sponsors or how does this get funded? Is this, do you fund this all yourself? Well, this one's where a tremendous, I didn't want to be. I'm [00:18:30] not mean responsible, but, you know, uh, in doubt with, uh, with, uh, with, uh, with an, uh, serious sponsors and, you [00:18:40] know, I got to pull this off and then suddenly this doesn't happen.

[00:18:44] So basically the company I worked for was the one that, um, Gave me [00:18:50] the bike, the motorcycle to go with also the whole maintenance on the motorcycles, but for the rest, it was my own savings. Wow. And what kind of bike is it? [00:19:00] It's a KTM 1290 super adventure, 2019. Okay. Well I'm sure some of our biking, there's just we'll know what that is.

[00:19:07] I don't know what that is, but [00:19:10] is it more of a, it's a very, it's a more powerful than big bike is more of a touring bike. Yeah, it's a touring bike. It's a mix between  [00:19:20] bike and the suspension is meant for jumping. Yeah. Gotcha. Yeah. So that way you can handle the dirt roads. Yeah. That makes sense. And so you work for this company, this is your you're co-owner of this country.

[00:19:30] [00:19:30] I'm the culinary. Yes. I'm working at the company is a chief mechanic and a tour guide. And tell us a little about the company you guys offer motorbike tours. [00:19:40] Yeah, the company is based in Quito. Ecuador. We have another branch in, were killed in the coast. So what we do is, uh, basically, uh, model cycle rentals, uh, [00:19:50] guided tours, self guided tours, and custom tailored tours.

[00:19:53] You tell me, you tell us for instance, what's your budget and how long you have on them on the time frame. And then [00:20:00] we build an adventure for you. Oh cool. And you lead them as well as rent the bikes and people can go by themselves. Yeah. For instance, when it comes to guided tour, we have [00:20:10] intercoms connected helmet to helmet.

[00:20:12] So we basically speak with the whole, uh, the whole party telling them what they're seeing. If there is any, anything going on in front of the, [00:20:20] in front of the road. You know, any advice, so whatever, when it comes to, to writing itself. So that's the guided tour, the self guided tour, [00:20:30] we gave them a pre-program GPS with all the stops, hotels and activities are included and the guys just follow the route and just go whenever they want to do.

[00:20:39] And they [00:20:40] eat whatever they want to eat and so on. Oh, that's cool. That sounds fun. It has. How has it been during the pandemic? Has business been slow or pretty good locals coming out? [00:20:50] Well, it's, it's been dead to be honest from March, 2020 until late August. And then we had our first, uh, local [00:21:00] guides, uh, local towards, sorry.

[00:21:02] Um, by the end of August and our first international customers came 1st of October. [00:21:10] So it started come back a little bit. Yeah. I spent pretty dead all over the world. Everybody I've talked to seems like in all these countries, it's this life shut down March 20th. Give or [00:21:20] take. Yeah, pretty much. Yeah. Yeah.

[00:21:23] So what other outdoor activities do you participate in? Probably don't have any time to participate in any other ones, [00:21:30] you know, as, as going in this, uh, uh, guiding, guiding business, um, some, some, some clients, for [00:21:40] instance, they ask us to, uh, do, um, Yeah, month and the orange here in Ecuador. So it's been a problem.

[00:21:45] We're going to build a route for you to, I came, uh, ties in different points and Aquila [00:21:50] we'll go higher to higher, higher, and then you go and climb, put the Foxy or Chimborazo for instance, there's some other clients that comes over and says, you know, we want to go birdwatching. [00:22:00] We'll find them. We'll build a Tory for you to go and do the birdwatching.

[00:22:03] We have. One of the talents is called Meadville. And this one has, that makes pieces. They have about [00:22:10] hovering 35 hummingbirds. Cool. So this is one of the main spots, internationally speaking for people who wants to come in and do some fair watching. [00:22:20] And we have class three and class four plus ravers, and Dan has some basing as well for those who wants to do kayaking and river rafting.

[00:22:28] Hmm. So you have all [00:22:30] kinds of stuff to do. Yeah. I kept myself pretty busy with, uh, with our customers, you know, they're really fun. Yeah. But yeah, that's pretty good. And pretty much you can operate year round that too, [00:22:40] right? Yes. Whether it's basically stable year round and we don't have winter season rainy season is, uh, is not Mont Sonic [00:22:50] as, as it would be in India, for instance.

[00:22:52] So it's, it's pretty steady. That's cool. So do you have any suggestions or advice for folks that want to get into the outdoor adventure biz? [00:23:00] Yeah, the main thing is do not procrastinate. That's that's the worst thing you can do. I mean, you know, I, I was talking [00:23:10] to people after the March 20th, 2020, and they saw regretted about that.

[00:23:16] Trip not being able to take or that business, they [00:23:20] couldn't start up or, you know, stuff that the, the salary grades so much in, and now it's, it's so much difficult because as I said before, I mean, borders, some countries, borders are [00:23:30] closed. There's some stuff that you wanted to do this year for some personal reason.

[00:23:35] And then you basically, you know, delay it for a couple of months and you [00:23:40] couldn't do it anymore. Yeah. Yeah. I was actually with, uh, one of our clients. He was supposed to come and he just kept on the lane and the lane, the lane, the lane, the reason why he [00:23:50] wanted to come and do the trip here in echo was because he had cancer.

[00:23:54] And unfortunately he passed away without doing this trip. No bummer. [00:24:00] That's too bad. Yeah. Yeah. And that's good advice. Just go for it. Don't delay. Do you have a. Sorry. Do you have a favorite piece of outdoor gear [00:24:10] that you purchased under a hundred dollars? Something that you just take with you all the time?

[00:24:14] Eh, Gore-Tex socks. Ah, Gore-Tex socks. Interesting. I don't know about those. I don't think. [00:24:20] Yeah, well, uh, there are some brands that they do these, uh, this, uh, socks made out of a Gore-Tex. Um, is it really [00:24:30] good? Because usually when you do a doodle, for instance, on a motorcycle, the doodle boots, they're not really waterproof, so you don't want to have your feet wet and then just go straight to the wind.

[00:24:40] [00:24:40] Or sometimes, you know, you're hiking in the mountains and. You put your work in your cortex and you, you kind of like have, uh, uh, your feet in a, in a [00:24:50] very comfortable situation. I think that's one of the main things to me. That's good. I'll have to check those out. Cause I don't go anywhere where it's I need that kind of thing, but it's good to know that they're out there, I guess.

[00:24:59] Yeah. [00:25:00] Um, as we wrap up here, is there anything else you'd like to say to our listeners or ask of our listeners? Yeah, well, um, well, if it's possible to ask, [00:25:10] um, the project is still ongoing, the seven summits, two wheels. So if you guys are willing to, uh, to help out maybe with a sponsorship or [00:25:20] ideas of how I can get sponsor, um, Rick has my, my contacts on Instagram and Facebook and everything, and it would be nice to, you know, uh, rich review [00:25:30] it in a way of speaking of your companies or yourselves.

[00:25:33] As a, as a co-founders for this, this enterprise. The other thing I [00:25:40] wanted to mention was that equal bike rental right now. And Aquila, we have this try it, the program, we're helping three different orphanages. So where basically. [00:25:50] Uh, directing, uh, 30% of the, of the revenue straight to these causes, um, the, whether it's for educational material [00:26:00] or, uh, maybe sense or working with another non-profit organization called pulse on recess.

[00:26:06] These guys are working with kids which need the organ [00:26:10] transfers or organ transplant. Sorry. Wow. Yeah. Thank you. So whatever you guys can help us out, come enjoy Ecuador, have a [00:26:20] right of your life. And in the meanwhile you were helping this, this people. That's great. Good for you. We'll link to we'll put links to all that stuff in the show notes.

[00:26:28] That way people can follow up and [00:26:30] find you. Yeah, that'd be great. Yeah. Thank you. It's been good talking to you, likewise. I mean, it's nice to be in a podcast finally. Yeah. Fun. [00:26:40] Fun. All right. Cool.

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