Photographer Scott Markewitz on his career and how to get in the Outdoor Biz [EP 254]

One of the most influential outdoor photographers in the industry Scott Markewitz talks about his career, some unique shooting experiences, and tips on how to become an Outdoor Photographer.

Show Notes

Intro to Outdoors and Photography

My stepping stone in, was, as a skier and becoming a professional skier and then moving onto the other side, from one side of the lens to the other, basically. I was a freestyle skier for oh three or four years competing on the pro mogul tour and then skiing in various ski movies and skiing for various photographers in the day.

Intro to Photography

I always had an interest in it growing up. I remember when I was really young, I had one of those box cameras and always enjoyed just shooting. But I guess my first,  SLR cameras probably, I got just out of high school, and I would take photos of friends and just carry a camera with me just as a hobby and, make prints and things like that.

That was my first camera. And then my first First real pro camera, I think one summer I decided, I was going to move into this profession a little bit after spending a lot of time in front of the camera, I figured I had a pretty good eye for it. And I thought it would be some fun to try and keep me skiing. So I bought a camera and started shooting and then, spent that a winter kind of half being a pro skier and half being, trying to start to shoot. And, that was kinda how I got into this business.

First outdoor commercial shoot

Actually, my first outdoor commercial shoot was for one of my ski sponsors for Elan Skis. So at the time, I was skiing competitively for Elan. And I had a small portfolio of images. So I basically went to them and said, Hey, here's some of my photos that I'm shooting myself and they're like, Oh, great. Do you want to shoot something for us? So it was a natural progression because I already had my foot in the door and had good connections in the industry. It was a pretty easy move for me, fortunately, so that was, having like I said, having the connections in the outdoor industry and in the ski industry definitely helped me move up pretty quickly.

Advice

I think If you're going to get into it, you really have to develop your skills and become an excellent photographer, not just a good photographer or videographer for that matter. I think you have to be really on top of your game, try to develop your own vision.

Don't just copy what's out there, think about what it is, why you want to be a photographer, and what it is you want to photograph, and really try to develop your skills to a high level. And try to find a niche that's gonna work for you. Cause it is a challenging business and definitely not getting any less challenging.

I would say also, as a photographer, I think it's important to shoot photo and video to have those dual skills, especially if you can develop good editing skills. I think that's important as well. But yeah, if you can have, a good overall package you can offer to a client, that's definitely a bonus.

Books

I'd say growing up one series. I liked to read was Carlos Casteneda. I always liked his books growing up. And I think that definitely influenced me.

One book I heard recently that I thought was really good was Trevor Noah's Born a Crime. It's really good, it was an audiobook and he was reading it. I just enjoy him so it was cool to hear him read it.

Favorite Piece of Gear under $100

Dakine wind stopper gloves. Someone gave me a pair as a Christmas present and I use them for trail running, mountain biking, I just use them all the time and they've held up really well.

F-Stop Deal

For the first 20 people who, want to pick up a new F-Stop pack. There's a 20% discount that F-Stop is offering and the way they can do that is contact me directly at my email, which is Scott@scottmarkewitz.com. And then I'll send them a code, which they can use on checkout on the f-stop website.

Connect with Scott

Website

Instagram: @scottmarkewitz

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/scott.markewitz.9

Scott@scottmarkewitz.com

 

Snippets

01:15 – 1:44  Intro to Outdoors

25:42 – 25:26  Favorite Books

27:19 – 27:42  Favorite Gear

20:35 – 22:02  Advice

Show Transcript

[00:00:00] Welcome back everyone today, I'm speaking with one of the most influential outdoor photographers in the industry. Scott Markowitz. Welcome to the show, Scott. Yeah. Thanks Rick. It's great to be here. And Yeah, I'm looking forward to talking to you if I'm sure we've run into each other at the shows, but I don't think we've officially met.

[00:00:15] So it's good to connect with another pro photographer. I'm an aspiring photographer and never made much money at it, but it's a great hobby. Yeah. That's a great way of making a living for sure. And yeah, the outdoor industry is small, so I'm sure somewhere along the way we've met in person, you meet so many [00:00:30] people.

[00:00:30]You just never know, but it is a small world, there's all. Yeah. One or two degrees of separation. That's a good thing. Sometimes it is. So let's start with how you were introduced to the outdoors and adventure. For me, I think,  it's really my blood, my father's a famous skier and even though I didn't grow up with him, I always followed his exploits and knew who he was and, had skiing in my blood and always wanted to pursue that myself.

[00:00:56] So that was my. My stepping stone in, was, as a [00:01:00] skier and becoming a professional skier and then moving onto the other side, from one side of the lens to the other, basically, how long were you a pro skier? I was a freestyle skier, so I was a prosecutor for.

[00:01:13] Oh three or four years competing on the pro mogul tour and then skiing in various ski movies and skiing for various photographers in the day. And so it was a natural stepping stone from there into being, a photographer, basically moving from one side of the camera to the other, when did you pick up [00:01:30] your first camera?

[00:01:31]I always had an interest in it growing up I remember when I was really young, I had one of those box cameras and always enjoyed just shooting. But I guess my first,  SLR cameras probably, I would just out of high school, and I would take photos of friends and just carry a camera with me just as a hobby and, make prints and things like that.

[00:01:53] But that was my first camera. And then my first First real pro camera. I think one once, summer I decided, [00:02:00] or, one, one, yeah, one summer I decided, I was going to  move into this profession a little bit after, after spending a lot of time in front of the camera, I figured I had pretty good eye for it.

[00:02:11] And thought it would be some fun to try and keep me skiing. So I bought a camera and started shooting and then, yeah. Spent that a winter kind of half being a pro skier and half being, trying to start to shoot. And, that was kinda how I got into this business.

[00:02:26] So that your first outdoor commercial shoot, what was that like? Who was it [00:02:30] for? Do you remember? Probably never forget that, right? Yeah. Actually, my first outdoor commercial shoot was for one of my ski sponsors for avant skews. So at the time I was skiing competitively for Alon.

[00:02:43]And had a small portfolio of images. So I basically went to them and said, Hey, here's here's some of my photos that I'm shooting myself and they're like, Oh, great. You want to shoot something for us? So it was a natural progression because I already had my foot in the door and had good connections in the industry.

[00:02:59]It was a [00:03:00] pretty, pretty easy move for me, fortunately, so that was, having like I said, there's. Having the connections in the outdoor industry and in the ski industry definitely helped me helped me move up pretty quickly. How about mainstream? How about your first mainstream commercial shoot?

[00:03:13] How did that come about? That one, those take longer to develop. You have to develop my reputation as a photographer and really get a lot published and start to market myself. I'm trying to think what that was my first one. Or one of the [00:03:30] first, maybe the first, one of the first one was at Hsu for tag lawyer.

[00:03:34] And now that was through through my connections at skiing magazine, they were doing a partnership with tag lawyer for an advertising campaign. So I, and they brought in let's see. Couple of pro skiers and pro snowboarders. And we'll do the shoot in Vail and had a, probably the, one of the first ones where it was very set up and very scripted.

[00:03:53] And, we had breeds to work from, and, stylists and assistance and, big crew, but it was fine. It was still [00:04:00] ski base. So it was still, definitely in my wheelhouse, but it was it was a good step to my first, No mainstream commercial shooting. I've done quite a few since then.

[00:04:07] Definitely focus more on commercial work in recent years as well. Cause I was looking at your website. It's beautiful work. Yeah. So I guess, yeah, the difference between a mainstream commercial shoot and an outdoor shoot is probably all the production stuff that goes on behind the scenes. Would you say, or what, how are those really different?

[00:04:28] Yeah, that's probably the main thing that's, [00:04:30] main difference between a, big time commercial shoot and an outdoor commercial shoot. A lot of the outdoor work I do. It's, a company will send me some gear to photograph and all line up some athletes or models and we'll go out and shoot for a day or two.

[00:04:41] Or there might be a, a little bit higher level production. There might someone from the company might come in and direct the shoot or be there with me and organize product and. Know, it might even be with their sponsored athletes, when you get into a mainstream commercial shoot, then you've got, PAs and stylist and, I have a rep, so my rep will [00:05:00] show up at some of those shoots.

[00:05:01] And, it turns into a 15 to 20 person crew, and then you've got the client and the ad agency and,  it's a big big production of magnets but it's It's fun and, that's, I enjoy those just for the different kinds of challenges that you get with it.

[00:05:15]You're gonna have to be really organized and really on top of your game. And, you can't really miss shots because some of the mainstream commercial shoots are with, big time professional athletes and, they have limited time and the client's expecting a lot, like one, one shoot.

[00:05:29] I did [00:05:30] for Puma golf, with Ricky Fowler and Lexi Thompson We had, they were also shooting a TV commercial the same day. So you had half a day, so four hours to shoot 25 outfit, 25 outfit changes. So I had a. I had a PA there and his only job was to manage a stopwatch and tell me when my time was up for each outfit, basically like five minutes, because without fit changes, [00:06:00] I had five minutes to shoot.

[00:06:01] And then we had, I don't know, say five minutes to change outfits, another five minutes for hair and makeup. So it was just this revolving, revolving door. I'd set them up on the T and have them see, do a bunch of swings and fire, and then it'd be like, okay, you got one minute.

[00:06:18] And then, luckily I had two athletes, so it was,  one was shooting the other one's getting ready. So it was, worked pretty well, but it was it's definitely high-paced production. I think I probably shot [00:06:30] in four hours, I bet. 20,000 images. Wow. Yeah, I believe it.

[00:06:33] Yeah. Yeah. Constant motor drive and then you get to, do you hand them off for editing or do you have to edit them before you send? No, there's a DIT there got an assistant handing me cameras and then a DIT on set who was basically just cattle, arguing the files, according to oh, product styles, basically. Then the agency would take them and they would do all the editing and post-production after the fact. So that makes sense. Yeah. I wouldn't want to add it back. I wouldn't want that [00:07:00] kind of production. Yeah, that'd be a lot of work. Yeah. So before shoot happens, do you have.

[00:07:09] A recipe or an idea. I know you get direction from whoever the client is, but do you go through your mind on some of the things you want to do and have an idea about the anatomy of a shoot? How's it?  My approach to, almost every commercial shoot I do is to really  understand or try to understand the brand and what they're trying to achieve and what their visual style is.

[00:07:30] [00:07:30] And a lot of times they'll send a brief, which really helps,  they'll put, images, examples of what they like and, sometimes even what they don't like. So you have a really good visual direction,  whether that's the case or not, I always go into a shoe trying to look at it from the brands side.

[00:07:44]What. What are they trying to achieve? And what kind of image is really going to suit them? You look at a lot of their other stuff to look at their previous, a lot of their other. Yeah. I study your brand beforehand and, look at their images, look at their website, look at their catalogs and just get a feel [00:08:00] for what you know, what their style is.

[00:08:02] And whether it's going to be, high action or a little more product focused or more lifestyle focused. Even what kind of gliding and setups are going to work, if it's, pretty dramatic or a little bit softer approach,  just things like that.

[00:08:16] I think really helped. Obviously they, client hires you for your vision, but I was like, adjust my vision to, to meet their brand style as well. Yeah. They have a brand ethos they're trying to maintain. So you got to stick with that. Yeah, exactly. And I think I see [00:08:30] a pretty common thing that, you know, visual.

[00:08:33] Visual artists do, photographers and videographers. They miss that point and they go into it. This would their vision, give them what they want. And sometimes that's great, because that's where you're hired for. But other times, they missed the Mark because they didn't consider what the brand wants and they just.

[00:08:51] You know what they like to do. Yeah. No, that makes a lot of sense. Yeah. Yeah. So your bio says you've become one of the most influential outdoor photographers in the industry [00:09:00] with a reputation as the go-to guy in the outdoor world. How did that, how did he develop that reputation? Just consistent work, a month.

[00:09:07]I think would be part of it. Yeah. Yeah. I think my work has shown, over the years I've shown really consistent work and consistent results, whenever I go into a shoot. Yeah, no matter what the conditions, I always look at it like, if the weather isn't great or the conditions aren't ideal, I always look at it what can we achieve out of this shoot?

[00:09:25]Maybe, maybe the client wants great, blue sky powder shots or, [00:09:30] perfect sunsets and it's cloudy, but, There's always something you can do to create, great images. And maybe you just have to pivot a little bit and shift your mindset and find something that's going to work.

[00:09:41] So I think, with that attitude, you can always come back with something. It might not be what you initially were hoping for. But you can come out with great results in the end and sometimes it just forces you to be more creative. Yeah, but sometimes you gotta be quick on your feet, right?

[00:09:55] Yeah. You do have to be quick on your feet, in many ways, but yeah, [00:10:00] I'd say just having that mindset, allows you to, instead of, going into the shoot and thinking, Oh, this isn't working because, we didn't get a, B and C the way we'd hoped for, but it's  okay AB and C isn't working, what can we do for plan D and still make it work?

[00:10:14] So I think, With that kind of mindset. You can be pretty consistent, every time a client hires me, I've always come back with something. I feel it's been really rare that I had to come out of a shoe and be like, Hey, sorry, I didn't really get much out of this.

[00:10:29] You [00:10:30] don't get a job. And then the second time, probably, yeah, you don't get a call back when you do that. So you always got to go into shoe, like with the eye, with the attitude that you're going to make it work somehow. Yeah. So where does your inspiration come from for me? My, my inspiration definitely started.

[00:10:47] And skiing, just my love for skiing and sports, but, I just loved being outside. And, I think my inspiration as a photographer is to try to capture that feeling and that, just a love for outdoor [00:11:00] sports and being out there. And, I always try to approach my images, trying to create authentic, looking images to capture that, that real experience,  always.

[00:11:10] Try to stay away from the shots that are too posed or to set up. And I know lacked that authenticity. And it was just because of my experience as a skier and a biker and a trail runner, when I get out there, I really want to do it. And I don't want to show that through my photography as well.

[00:11:26] And it helps a lot. Yeah, exactly. Yeah. So talk to our [00:11:30] listeners about the first great photo or photo shoot you took that set you on your path. Is there a one, one thing that. That really led to your career or was it just the consistency of the time? The moment that really stands out for me is like I said, when I bought a camera and started shooting that first season that summer, that's, in the spring I had, catalog of images and I sent them in to, I think PA powder and maybe a couple other magazines.

[00:11:57] And then that summer, I actually went to Europe to coach a [00:12:00] ski camp. I was one of the coaches and And I came back and I remember walking into a magazine shop. I was on the East coast at the time, food back into the, into New York and was there for a little bit and walked into a magazine shop and did a double-take because my photo was on the cover of spotter magazine.

[00:12:15] Cool. I was like that's a pretty good sign. Your first Publix photo is the cover of powders, but I figured that was a good sign that I should probably keep pursuing this. That's cool. And do you have any [00:12:30] favorite activities or sports to photograph or people to photograph what's been the most fun or what do you enjoy the most?

[00:12:37]I've, as far as people I've worked with so many just incredible, athletes, people that are just love what they do and are doing it at a super high level. And, I've always really enjoyed that because one thing I've found, the athletes and the people that.

[00:12:51] Make this, their living,  whatever aspect that is, they're basically getting paid to do what they love. So they're pretty fun. They're pretty fun people to [00:13:00] hang out with and they're having a good time, it's not like they hate their jobs and they're doing photos cause they just cause they have to, it's they love it and they're all very like-minded so that's one, one aspect I really loved.

[00:13:11] But as far as subjects, I like to show you, My background is skiing. Always love to shoot skiing. That's been first and foremost, I'm also a mountain biker and a trail runner, enjoy shooting that, but anything, outdoors getting out there whether it's, hiking, running, biking, or even just, people [00:13:30] outdoors doing active lifestyle.

[00:13:31] Yeah. For me, that's just fun. I'm super fortunate to be able to work outside and, Do this job and not being stuck inside in an office all day. And so for me, that's, that's really inspiring and, motivates me to keep doing what I do because I do feel really fortunate and definitely love what I do.

[00:13:50] Very cool. How about the most challenging or the weather? The weather is always challenging. The weather is always telling for sure. And like I said, you have to learn to work around it, you can't do anything [00:14:00] about the weather, so you gotta adapt. Yeah. Any times when you're in the middle of the shoot you started and you realized, okay, we're going to start this, but we don't have all the outfits.

[00:14:08] So one of those out there outfits arriving, or the end of the second. There's all kinds of interesting challenges. I did a footwear shoot once and they had one shoe for each prototype or each sample. So I just shoot people, being active or pertaining to be active with one shoe on their foot.

[00:14:28] That must've been [00:14:30] really tough. So yeah, that was that took some creative freedom adjustments for sure. But yeah, there's, there's stuff like that, where product doesn't come through as expected, sizes and ride and you have to pin it or do whatever, shoot from a certain angle so that you don't show the big rip in the side or something there, something like that, yeah. There's no buttons on the jacket, whether just, cold tamps and, hot temps and. Being out there for hours with little food and water [00:15:00] and, just, some of the adventure trips I've done, you go pretty hard and you're out there for many days at a time.

[00:15:06] And, once I did a mountain bike adventure we a mountain bike, the Haute route, a version of the whole group from  cool. And on the first down and all the first day, I went over to the bars with my camera pack, my ribs. So I had to finish the rest of the ride with know cracked ribs [00:15:30] painful too.

[00:15:30] Yeah, it was painful. So I couldn't take it. I couldn't risk falling again. So I had to be super careful on the downhills and I couldn't go up Hill very hard because I couldn't breathe really hard. Things like that, that was a challenge. How they really tough. Yeah. Good for you for sticking with it.

[00:15:45] Holy cow.  Yeah. In the end it worked out, but it definitely threw a wrench in the whole plan to tell your grandkids. Yeah, exactly. I remember when I was young, I cracked my [00:16:00] ribs and kept going for days. Come on, you can do this, you can do it. But the only other challenge, one of the.

[00:16:07] Challenges with working with, every once in a while you get a difficult person to work with, and then that you have to just adjust your attitude and try to get it done and not get too wrapped up in, in their issues or whatever it is. But that's pretty rare, it does happen.

[00:16:22] And that definitely makes it, it makes it challenging, especially if you're working with a crew and yeah, it can bring the whole crew down and you've got to [00:16:30] be like, okay guys, let's just. Get it done and keep our spirits up and not let this, difficult person bring the whole shoot down, in the end you still gotta get, you still gotta deliver for the client.

[00:16:40] So that can be a challenge for sure. Yeah. And how has COVID impacted your business? Probably not much travel, right? Yeah. Really in the spring, unfortunately when COVID hit, I had a bunch of ski work lined up for the spring and that. Immediately went away and then, [00:17:00] a spring, progressed into summer.

[00:17:02] Some of the outdoor work started coming back on, but it was all, regional stuff we could drive to. Yeah. Or, like I live in Utah, so we did some stuff in California and Colorado and Montana, but it was all stuff we could drive to. And then Recently, I've done a couple of air travel trips.

[00:17:19] I was just set up in Alaska on a shoot and had to get tested beforehand. And,  we have our group and we just stay super isolated and follow our protocols. So it's [00:17:30] definitely, you have to just be more careful and do your best, you have to balance, unfortunately, it'd be nice if we could just, not have to go anywhere and stay isolated until this whole pandemic goes away or until the vaccines are widely distributed, but, we gotta work.

[00:17:46] So you've got to balance out the risk versus reward and try to still get the job done and minimize the risks by, if you can drive and, Different. Definitely a few. If you're working with a group, try to have everyone get tested beforehand and just [00:18:00] minimize all the risk factors and then, you can still get things done, I would say.

[00:18:03]But yeah, it definitely adds another layer of challenge to the whole job of being a photographer. Anybody's job. It's been tough. It's been tough. Yeah. People that can work remotely don't have as much of a challenge cause they can just shift their office and they can work from home and get things done and, stay in their little bubble.

[00:18:23] For what I do and other outdoor photographers, you have to, the one benefit is working outside is [00:18:30] less risky, and you can socially distance pretty well, but you are working with, with different people and you don't know what they're, what they're, where they've been, where they've been yeah.

[00:18:42]Associated with and stuff and exposed to. So yeah, you definitely, there are some risks for sure. And so far so good and. It's smart that you have a set of protocols to follow and you, your team is, pretty consistent. And you just, like you say, you just got to stick with what you do and manage it the [00:19:00] best you can.

[00:19:01] Yeah. That's all you can do. And, hopefully the vaccine's going to come around relatively quickly and then  and it is effective. And then I'll get back to a somewhat normal lives. Although I. I would say that life is definitely not going to go back to what it used to be, no matter what this new normal becomes.

[00:19:19] Yeah. Yeah. Do you have any suggestions or advice for folks wanting to get into photography? I would say, one thing I've noticed that, when I got into it you can [00:19:30] make it as a photographer by, just being a good, decent photographer. There were. There are more outlets, like more editorial publications.

[00:19:38] Yeah. That's a tough business drinking. Yeah. Crazy. And more clients willing to pay, reasonable fees. There was, the stock photography business was was a viable way to make a living. And now I think there's just fewer avenues and in general, lower budgets and fewer magazines.

[00:19:57] And so there's fewer options. So I think. [00:20:00] If you're going to get into it, you really have to develop your skills and become a, an excellent photographer, not just a good photographer or videographer for that matter. Yeah. I think you have to be really on top of your game, develop, try to develop your own vision.

[00:20:12]Don't just copy what's out there really, think about what it is, why you want to be a photographer and what it is you want to photograph and really try to develop your skills to a high level. And. And, trying to try to find a niche that's gonna work for you.

[00:20:26] Cause it is a challenging business and definitely getting, not getting [00:20:30] any less challenging. Yeah, for sure. And continue to evolve and change. Yeah. I would say also, as a photographer, I think it's important to shoot photo and video to have that, Dual skills for Sherrick is especially if you can develop a good editing skills.

[00:20:45] I think that's important as well. But yeah, if you can have a, a good overall package you can offer to a client, that's definitely a bonus. And I think also,  I've definitely branched out into video the last several years. And one thing I noticed about shooting videos that, [00:21:00] it's a different approach and shooting photography than shooting photos.

[00:21:03]Just a different way of looking things. And I think the two compliment each other really well. Like my photo background definitely helps my videography, in terms of lighting and set up. And then, video videography is more about telling a story. So that helps my photo, the photo side, because,  can approach photo projects more from a storytelling aspect in some ways.

[00:21:23] So the two, two definitely compliment each other. So I think it's important. Yeah. No. That's good advice. Yeah. [00:21:30] If you were able to hang a huge banner in the front of one of the trade shows and alter a retailer essay or something, what would it say? I don't know. Actually, that's a good question. The trade show to me is a bit of a dinosaur it's.

[00:21:44]I don't know that we'll ever go to one again, but yeah, I don't know if they'll ever be a trade show because maybe the. The is get out now while you can. That's good. Yeah. Yeah, which is too bad, cause I've always really enjoyed trade [00:22:00] shows. It's,  it's an archaic way of doing business, these days, but it was always a great way to, to network and connect with people and see.

[00:22:08] See old friends and connections in the outdoor world and yeah,  there's the ski show, the outdoor show, the bike show. Those are all trade shows that I went to regularly and, there's trade shows for every, and or there were trade shows for every industry. So I think, on a personal, just for personal connections and I think, that's that's just a big side of doing business.

[00:22:29] And especially as [00:22:30] a photographer, that's where. A lot of my work would come from just making those personal connections at the show. I re I know, I really miss that aspect of the whole industry and sad, just sad to see it go away. But yeah, I think I'd be surprised if any, in person trade shows really come back, especially on a national level maybe regional or,  smaller gatherings where it just Local reps and dealers can get together.

[00:22:55] Something like that, or a brand, brands are doing their own sort of [00:23:00] dealer events, things like that. But yeah, I think the trade show unfortunately is a thing of the past. Yeah. Yeah. I agree. I agree with you. Yeah. Do you have any daily routines you use to keep your sanity? You must get outside and exercise a lot.

[00:23:11] Do you meditate or any of that kind of stuff? I try to stretch know almost every day. Just a combination of stretching and yoga. And then yeah, exercise, I run and bike, or ski pretty much, four to five days a week, all year round, depending on the season, I'll run it in the [00:23:30] winter.

[00:23:30] If I only have an hour to get out of the office and, do a quick run and I'll overrun or, and then get out ski tour or whatever I can do, I definitely. That's always been, part of the reason I got into photography is that it allows me to keep doing this stuff outside.

[00:23:46] And so that's always been a big part of my life is to make sure I set aside time to be able to get out and stay active for sure. Cause, and also, I think as a photographer, as an outdoor and action. Sports adventure photographer. It's [00:24:00] important to stay in shape and be able to get out there.

[00:24:02] You gotta be able to keep up with those athletes and the the director of the shoot right pack on your back, so I have to stay in shape to do what I do, but it's also, what I love to do. And yeah, I definitely, it's important to set aside time to do that and not just get stuck into it.

[00:24:18]Working all the time and sit in behind the computer editing photos, you know that don't make you old fast. That's right. Yeah. Old decrepit. Yeah, exactly. Do you have any favorite books or books you give as [00:24:30] gifts? I'm trying to think, I would say with our whole digital world books have gotten.

[00:24:39] Or Kindle on my iPad. Yeah. Yeah. Not so much, I used to read a lot of  just I don't know, classic fiction works. And then, I'd say grow I'm at one, one series. I like to read. I always like to read with Carlos. Casteneda always liked his books growing up. And I think that definitely influenced me cool.

[00:24:59] I don't know, one [00:25:00] book I heard recently that I thought was really good. It was Trevor Noah's born a crime. No, I haven't heard of that. Yeah. It's really good. It was an audio book. Yeah. And he was reading it. I just enjoy him. So it was cool to hear him read it. Yeah. As far as books, for gifts, I just try to, pick a book that I think is going to fit that person.

[00:25:19]Whether it's some people are more into history, some people were more into, Real life experiences. And some people are more into fantasy or politics or [00:25:30] fiction, whatever. So I just kinda, didn't go, we buy books as gifts, but I just, I don't go into with a set mindset on what I'm going to do.

[00:25:37] I just browse and thinking about the person I'm buying it for and it'd be like, Oh what looks interesting for them? That makes sense. Yeah. Obviously political books these days are very popular and definitely read up on my political yeah, man. I'm trying to avoid that stuff.

[00:25:50] It makes me just too antsy, too agitated. Yeah. Yeah, for sure. But I think it's important to stay up. Do you ever know [00:26:00] what's real and what's not real. Yeah. That's getting harder to, yeah, it is for sure. Do you have a favorite piece of outdoor gear under a hundred dollars? Something that you always have with you or one thing I got was seems a,  not the most important piece of gear is these The kind wind stopper gloves.

[00:26:18] Someone gave me as a Christmas present and I use them like for trail running for mountain biking. I just use them all the time and they've held up really well. And they're just for whatever reason, like I always come back to [00:26:30] those, these to wind stopper gloves. Cause they're light. They I can put them like over my mountain bike gloves, if it's really cold or I can wear them just.

[00:26:38] Or money. Cause they're pretty warm as is. So I just find when the temps temperature a little cold or this pair of gloves is always always with me, for some reason I was running with him yesterday, actually. Cool. So that's kinda what made me think about that, about those guys, but it's dry. Lots of other little items I use, but Oh yeah.

[00:26:55] We've all got to punch a little, get just that's her, live in our pack, but gloves are, yeah. I have [00:27:00] a pair of gloves, not the kind, but yeah, same kind of thing. Love him. And Scott, you guys mentioned, I know your sponsor f-stop as a coupon code or discount code that they have for people. How does that work?

[00:27:10] Yeah, that's right. For the first 20 20 people who, want to pick up a new pack. There's a 20% discount that stock is offering. Cool. And the way they can do that is contact me directly at my email, which isScott@scottmarkowitz.com. And then I can send them a code, which they can use on checkout on the f-stop website.

[00:27:30] [00:27:29] Excellent. I think it's good. And I think it's good for any f-stop product. So it's pretty good discount and the packs are awesome. I've been using them for. For quite a few years now. And  they're amazing callbacks for working in the outdoors and just general camera use there.

[00:27:42] Yeah, they look good. I've been I've been coveting a loca for years. It's one of my favorites actually. Yeah. Cool. All your email will be in the show notes too, but I won't put the discount code in the show notes so we can keep that Selective per f-stops wishes, but yeah, just contact score for that code.

[00:27:58] And you guys get a nice new f-stop [00:28:00] pack and protect all your gear while you're out there doing all the crazy things you do in the back country or front country. As we wrap up, is there anything else you'd like to say to our audience or ask of our audience? Off the top of my head? Not specifically.

[00:28:13]Yeah, I just, one thing just about what I do, I feel. I feel really fortunate to be able to do what I love to do. And, you've made a career out of it, something that really just started out as a whim to something. And I'm like, I don't think I would give this a try. And it was really more way just to keep me out skiing [00:28:30] and doing something outdoors and somehow turn it into a, long standing career and an incredible way of life.

[00:28:36]I feel really fortunate and that's just one message, if you can make. You can do what you love and make it work, I don't think there's a better way of living. Yep. I agree. Yep. And if people want to follow up with you, where can they find you Twitter? I'm sure you're on all the socials.

[00:28:50] Yeah, Instagram's probably my main one. Scott Markowitz on Instagram, my website, Scott markowitz.com. Mark Woods photo on Twitter. Scott, Mark would start [00:29:00] gruffy on Facebook, but cool. Instagram is my main one. Check me out there. I'm not a super regular poster, but I get stuff on there once in a while and try to keep up on it and perfect.

[00:29:11]Keep people updated with what I'm up to. So linked all that stuff in the show notes. Yeah. Awesome. It was great talking to you, Scott. Thanks for coming on. Yeah, thanks for having me. It's been good talking to you too, and look forward to seeing the show. All right, cool. I'll let you know when it drops.

[00:29:25] Okay. Awesome. Take it easy. Yeah, you too. Thanks.

 

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

Scroll to top